“Forbidden Fruit” A Taste of Cuban Independent Films

Coral Gables Art Cinema presents Forbidden Fruit, a showcase of Cuban Independent Films in the 21st Century. Inspired by the MoMA exhibition Cuban Cinema under Censorship, the program sought to push Cuban independent filmmakers to the forefront. Although the humor is very niche and might be appreciated by those more knowledgeable of the cultural “intricacies” of Cuban speak, the films offer a wide range of stories told through narratives and documentaries. Opening night featured two short films by director Juan Pablo Daranas Molina and two “micro-shorts” by Juan Carlos Cremata Malberti, followed by Enrique Colina’s feature length documentary.

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Ironing Out the Kinks in A Winkle in Time

So many characters, so little personality

As the forty minute mark approached during my screening of Ava DuVernay’s A Wrinkle in Time (2018), I struggled with a simple question: Is it possible to review a film you walked out on? When I write about a film, I try to deliver more than a recommendation or a warning. A review should cast a spotlight on an aspect of filmmaking or storytelling that audiences and creators alike should treasure – unless the product is so bad, it should be obliterated for the cathartic entertainment of others. However, there’s a rare exception to my line of thought, where a product becomes a vehicle for a valuable lesson in the creative process. In the case of A Wrinkle in Time, while the fact that I walked out of the theater should be an indication of the film’s quality, it should mostly be a display of the importance of keeping your audience invested through compelling story elements.

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A Fantastic Woman: As The Name Implies

Marina Vidal, our Fantastic Woman

As one of this year’s nominees for Best Foreign Film, Sebastián Lelio’s A Fantastic Woman covers a sensitive issue well, delivering a powerful film worthy of its Oscar nod. A Fantastic Woman follows aspiring singer Marina Vidal (Daniela Vega) through her experiences as a transgender woman who wants nothing more than to fulfill her life goals. Unfortunately, when her boyfriend Orlando (Francisco Reyes) suddenly dies, Marina finds herself unable to properly mourn, as Orlando’s family are quick to throw suspicion and scorn towards our protagonist when they discover her gender identity.

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